Tag Archives: Corporate & Social Responsibility

Examples of corporations that are positively impacting the community

Renewable Energy Complexity

This semester I decided to branch out in my course selection and take a class on renewable energy systems.  Energy production and procurement are keys to economic development and energy security is becoming an important issue in political circles.  It has been said that the wards of the previous century were fought for oil, which underscores the vital importance fossil reserves have played in industrial development and economic power concentration.  The course has been informative, I now know what is meant by peak oil, and have learned there is also a peak coal (the point at which resource production reaches a maximum before annual production declines).  As part of a project for this course I have chosen to research the Danish island of Samso, which has recently become a globally recognized project in renewable energy and carbon emission neutrality.

Intel’s “Helmets for kids”

A couple of days ago, we visited Intel’s Test facility in Ho Chi Minh city. Mr. Prunty, Finance Director, talked to us about Vietnam’s overall business environment and Intel’s strategy. But one thing that stood up for me was the involvement of Intel in the “Helmets for kids” program. The purpose if this program is to implement child road safety in Vietnam, where riding motorbikes is one of the main means of transport. Though Vietnam has a mandatory helmet law, this law doesn’t apply to children. Intel’s approach to help solve this issue is providing free helmets to schools and having employees educate students about the correct use of helmets. I think this is a great way for Intel to contribute to the safety of children in Vietnam and to give back to the community.

Coffee the new “black gold”

Trung Nguyen, the world’s number one coffee. Today, we visited Trung Nguyen a Vietnamese coffee business that sells packaged coffee as well as having physical coffee shops. Much like our Starbucks (which are practically non-existent here in Vietnam due to government restrictions) Trung Nguyen focuses on differentiating itself from its competitors through a unique café experience as well as marketing their high quality coffee. However, the thing that differentiates Trung Nguyen the most in my mind was their very ambitious mission statements and product enthusiasm. “Black gold”, a term that for Trung Nguyen has gone from meaning oil to meaning coffee. Our presenter spoke with such esteem about the future prospects coffee has for the world as a global community. Even though it was really weird hearing Trung Nguyen talk as if coffee was the fluid that made the world go around; it was really refreshing because it felt as if they truly believed in the product and experience they are selling. Through a business perspective Trung Nguyen believes in a sustainable mission and has huge aspirations to be a leader in the global coffee market, I was really impressed with their vision and I am interested in seeing how they perform in the future.

The philosophy of coffee

Today’s visit at Trung Nguyen coffee, a famous and well-respected coffee brand in Vietnam, made me think a lot about the culture of coffee in America. In Vietnam, coffee-drinking is synonymous to socializing time. Unlike the Starbucks model in America, coffee shops in Vietnam are almost like cafe’s or restaurants in their own way. People go to coffee houses and stay anywhere from 30 minutes to 3-4 hours. They go to coffee houses to work, have a date, hang out with friends, relax, or do business. There are a whole lot of coffee shops in Vietnam, ranging from small road-side stands with a few plastic stools to high-end luxury houses with plushy leather couches. Regardless of where and when you drink coffee in Vietnam though, you will see that the Vietnamese people will sit down and spend some time drinking their coffee, as it is the nature of the unique drip-filter coffee.

Coffee the new “black gold”

Trung Nguyen, the world’s number one coffee. Today, we visited Trung Nguyen a Vietnamese coffee business that sells packaged coffee as well as having physical coffee shops. Much like our Starbucks (which are practically non-existent here in Vietnam due to government restrictions) Trung Nguyen focuses on differentiating itself from its competitors through a unique café experience as well as marketing their high quality coffee. However, the thing that differentiates Trung Nguyen the most in my mind was their very ambitious mission statements and product enthusiasm. “Black gold”, a term that for Trung Nguyen has gone from meaning oil to meaning coffee. Our presenter spoke with such esteem about the future prospects coffee has for the world as a global community. Even though it was really weird hearing Trung Nguyen talk as if coffee was the fluid that made the world go around; it was really refreshing because it felt as if they truly believed in the product and experience they are selling. Through a business perspective Trung Nguyen believes in a sustainable mission and has huge aspirations to be a leader in the global coffee market, I was really impressed with their vision and I am interested in seeing how they perform in the future.

Trung Nguyen

Today we experienced a company visit that turned out to be my favorite thus far on this program to South East Asia: Trung Nguyen Corporation. Trung Nguyen processes, supplies, and sells coffee and coffee related products, and its vision is almost as complex as the process by which one pronounces the firm’s name (that is to say, it’s pretty damn complex).

Development Economics

Economists that are focused on the development of impoverished populations often agree that the two most important inputs to breaking the poverty cycle are access to credit and property rights. Property rights, and closely related law and order and corruption issues, seem to moving slowing but surely in the right direction since the installment of the new democratic government. Access to credit however, seems to moving with breakneck speed.

Reaction to BPTN visit and conversation with Mr. Jerry Ng

During the past fall semester, I had the opportunity to be part of a course on Women, Pease and Justice in the world. I found the class to be extremely worthwhile, as learning more about the concept of microfinance highlighted a way for me to combine my passion for social justice and women’s empowerment with saavy comm-school business principles.

As such, I found Mr. Ng’s business model for BPTN truly inspirational and motivating. One thing is to talk about microfinance and helping the productive poor by also “doing well” and reaping profits, and another thing is to actually be able to materialize such a combination. effectively.